Christian stewardship isn’t restricted to tithing and philanthropy. It extends to our daily vocation, to the good work our God-given talents and opportunities have called us to. Ironically, this fact is most often missed concerning the very type of workers featured in the parable of vocational stewardship, the parable of the talents. There three servants are called to use their master’s money to go into business and turn a profit. They’re called to be entrepreneurs.

This first lesson in the series affirms a variety of callings, but it pauses on the vocation of business since it is so often misunderstood. The call of the entrepreneur is a true, creative calling that should be encouraged and nurtured by the church, not disdained. It is not based on greed, nor is the wealth gained in one place necessarily wealth lost somewhere else.

As creative beings made in the image of a creative God, humans are capable of creating new wealth, new value. Thus, we should avoid contrasting our professional work with our faith and philanthropy. Instead, we should integrate all aspects of our lives under a broad, biblical understanding of stewardship.

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